Fed report: Amend laws so ‘gay’ rights trump faith

Image result for smug obamaFed report: Amend laws so ‘gay’ rights trump faith <div style=”display:none;”>< img src=”http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-d9XxhfbZ3mYSM.gif” border=”0″ height=”1″ width=”1″ alt=”Quantcast”/>< /div> <img src=”https://d5nxst8fruw4z.cloudfront.net/atrk.gif?account=nnBqk1aUy100E7″ style=”display:none” height=”1″ width=”1″ alt=”” />

The Obama administration long has been forcing Christians and others of faith to violate their beliefs to accommodate “nondiscrimination” laws that give special privileges to homosexuals and transgendered persons, and now a federal commission has proposed codifying the practice.

WND has reported several times on the Obama effort to turn the Constitution’s protections for “freedom of religion” into the seemingly innocuous “freedom of worship.”

Rafael Cruz, the father of one-time GOP presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, warned that Cuba, even at its most repressive, claimed to allow “freedom of worship.”

The author of the book “A Time for Action: Empowering the Faithful to Reclaim America” contends such an interpretation of the Constitution would be devastating for America.

“Most Christians don’t realize the danger of freedom of worship,” Rafael Cruz said in an interview on “Hagee Hotline” with pastor Matthew Hagee. “Freedom of worship is not the same as freedom of religion. Every communist country around the world has freedom of worship. What freedom of worship means is you can worship inside a house of worship.”

Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is on record insisting that to protect “gay” rights, “deep-seated cultural codes, religious beliefs and structural biases have to be changed.”

Now a new report from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights moves pointedly that direction, even lamenting that the Constitution limits governmental burdens on religion.

The agency’s recent report, “Peaceful Coexistence: Reconciling Nondiscrimination Principles with Civil Liberties,” gets immediately to the point.

Religion ‘infringes’ on civil rights

On the first of 306 pages, the “letter of transmittal” to Barack Obama states, “Religious exemptions to the protections of civil rights based upon classifications such as race, color, national origin, sex, disability status, sexual orientation, and gender identity, when they are permissible, significantly infringe upon these civil rights.”

It says the fault lies with the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause, which “constricts the ability of government actors to curtail private citizens’ rights to the protections of nondiscrimination laws and policies.”

“Although the First Amendment’s Free Exercise Clause and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act … limit the ability of government actors to impede individuals from practicing their religious beliefs, religious exemptions from nondiscrimination laws and policies must be weighed carefully and defined narrowly on a fact-specific basis,” states the letter.

The letter, based on hundreds of pages of arguments compiled for the past three years, says the commission believes “overly-broad religious exemptions unduly burden nondiscrimination laws and policies.”

“Federal and state courts, lawmakers, and policy-makers at every level must tailor religious exceptions to civil liberties and civil rights protections as narrowly as applicable law requires.”

The commission says RFRA “protects only religious practitioners; First Amendment free exercise rights, and it does not limit others’ freedom from government-imposed religious limitations under the Establishment Clause.”

“In the absence of controlling authority to the contrary such as a state-level, RFRA-type statute, the recognition of religious exemptions to nondiscrimination laws and policies should be made pursuant to the holdings of Employment Division v. Smith, which protect religious beliefs rather than conduct.”

Then the commission gets to what it really wants, stating federal legislation “should be considered to clarify that RFRA creates First Amendment Free Exercise Clause rights only for individuals and religious institutions and only to the extent that they do not unduly burden civil liberties and civil rights protections against status-based discrimination.”

“States with RFRA-style laws should amend those statutes to clarify that RFRA creates First Amendment Free Exercise Clause rights only for individuals and religious institutions. States with laws modeled after RFRA must guarantee that those statutes do not unduly burden civil liberties and civil rights with status-based discrimination.”

A majority of the eight-member commission, which makes recommendations but does not have the power to impose change, is lobbying for a precedent that would give homosexual or transgender rights preference over religious rights.

The commissioners deliberately chose to single out for denigration Christian colleges or organizations that don’t promote homosexuality and business owners who choose not to endorse homosexuality with their artistic talents, such as photography and cake-making.

Four of the commissioners are appointed by the president and four by Congress to six-year terms, with no more than four members allowed to be of the same political party.

However, the current commission has only one Republican member, Peter Kirsanow, and four Democrat members. Three members are “independents.”

The president also designates the chairman and vice-chairman from among the commission’s members with the concurrence of a majority of the members.

‘War on religious freedom’

The nonprofit legal group Liberty Counsel called the commissions recommendations “a shocking example of the war against religious freedom in America.”

“The commission’s report is a shameful anti-American and anti-God document that trashes religious freedom,” said Mat Staver, founder and chairman of Liberty Counsel.

Staver charge the commission’s chairman, Democrat Martin Castro, is “out of touch with reality and with our Constitution.”

“He and the other members of the commission who agree with him want to throw out the First Amendment and trash religious freedom whenever faith and practice collides with an intolerant LGBT agenda,” Staver said. “The report is a declaration of war against religious freedom. George Washington said anyone who works against the twin pillars of religion and morality cannot be called a ‘Patriot.’ This report is un-American.”

Commissioner Kirsanow, the panel’s lone Republican, said the problem is that people are enamored with “gay rights” and “transgender rights” and are inserting their own desires into the Constitution.

“The tension between nondiscrimination and religious liberty is based on the assumption that the rights in conflict are of equal weight, or even that nondiscrimination is of greater weight,” he said. “This assumption is erroneous. Religious liberty is an undisputed constitutional right. With the exception of racial nondiscrimination principles embedded in the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenths Amendments, nondiscrimination principles are statutory or judicially created constructs.”

Two worldviews

Kirsanow described the sharp differences on the commission as a “conflict between two worldviews.”

“The first, which is secularism, holds an individual’s unfettered sexual self-expression as a preeminent concern because it is an aspect of their self-creation,” he explained. “This interest in the individual is now construed as a positive responsibility to ensure that everyone has the ability to engage in sexual conduct without cost or consequence, whether in money, unwanted children, or hurt feelings.

“An individual’s sexual behavior is considered an act of self-creation and something that goes to the deepest level of their identity. Criticism of an individual’s behavior is considered an attack on the dignity of the person. Naturally, this worldview is at odds with many aspects of traditional morality grounded in sexual restraint.

“The second worldview holds that individuals are not their own judge, but rather are subject to divine law and divine judgment. The morality of a person’s conduct does not ultimately depend upon whether he thinks it is right, or whether it accords with his desires, but whether it conforms to divine law.”

He said the “rub” is that the first group does not recognize sin as sin, and the second group does.

The Obama administration’s move to make the standard “freedom of worship” dates back to early in his tenure.

Catholic Online and other media outlets reported what appeared to be a deliberate misdirection regarding what the Constitution requires.

Catholic Online noted that in President Obama’s June 2009 speech in Cairo, Egypt, he spoke of a Muslim America and the nation’s “freedom of religion,” but by the November 2009 memorial for the Fort Hood soldiers gunned down by a homicidal Muslim, he was terming it “freedom of worship.”

From that point, “freedom of worship” has become the term of choice, the report said.

Under fire

Sarah Torre of the Heritage Foundation said the difference is significant. In practice, the “freedom to worship” seldom has been challenged or even questioned. But “freedom of religion” is under direct fire.
Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2016/09/fed-report-amend-laws-so-gay-rights-trump-faith/#gak7Uuh9ZlKtVBid.99

Fed report: Amend laws so ‘gay’ rights trump faith <div style=”display:none;”>< img src=”http://pixel.quantserve.com/pixel/p-d9XxhfbZ3mYSM.gif” border=”0″ height=”1″ width=”1″ alt=”Quantcast”/>< /div> <img src=”https://d5nxst8fruw4z.cloudfront.net/atrk.gif?account=nnBqk1aUy100E7″ style=”display:none” height=”1″ width=”1″ alt=”” />

The Obama administration long has been forcing Christians and others of faith to violate their beliefs to accommodate “nondiscrimination” laws that give special privileges to homosexuals and transgendered persons, and now a federal commission has proposed codifying the practice.

WND has reported several times on the Obama effort to turn the Constitution’s protections for “freedom of religion” into the seemingly innocuous “freedom of worship.”

Rafael Cruz, the father of one-time GOP presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, warned that Cuba, even at its most repressive, claimed to allow “freedom of worship.”

The author of the book “A Time for Action: Empowering the Faithful to Reclaim America” contends such an interpretation of the Constitution would be devastating for America.

“Most Christians don’t realize the danger of freedom of worship,” Rafael Cruz said in an interview on “Hagee Hotline” with pastor Matthew Hagee. “Freedom of worship is not the same as freedom of religion. Every communist country around the world has freedom of worship. What freedom of worship means is you can worship inside a house of worship.”

Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is on record insisting that to protect “gay” rights, “deep-seated cultural codes, religious beliefs and structural biases have to be changed.”

Now a new report from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights moves pointedly that direction, even lamenting that the Constitution limits governmental burdens on religion.

The agency’s recent report, “Peaceful Coexistence: Reconciling Nondiscrimination Principles with Civil Liberties,” gets immediately to the point.

Religion ‘infringes’ on civil rights

On the first of 306 pages, the “letter of transmittal” to Barack Obama states, “Religious exemptions to the protections of civil rights based upon classifications such as race, color, national origin, sex, disability status, sexual orientation, and gender identity, when they are permissible, significantly infringe upon these civil rights.”

It says the fault lies with the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause, which “constricts the ability of government actors to curtail private citizens’ rights to the protections of nondiscrimination laws and policies.”

“Although the First Amendment’s Free Exercise Clause and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act … limit the ability of government actors to impede individuals from practicing their religious beliefs, religious exemptions from nondiscrimination laws and policies must be weighed carefully and defined narrowly on a fact-specific basis,” states the letter.

The letter, based on hundreds of pages of arguments compiled for the past three years, says the commission believes “overly-broad religious exemptions unduly burden nondiscrimination laws and policies.”

“Federal and state courts, lawmakers, and policy-makers at every level must tailor religious exceptions to civil liberties and civil rights protections as narrowly as applicable law requires.”

The commission says RFRA “protects only religious practitioners; First Amendment free exercise rights, and it does not limit others’ freedom from government-imposed religious limitations under the Establishment Clause.”

“In the absence of controlling authority to the contrary such as a state-level, RFRA-type statute, the recognition of religious exemptions to nondiscrimination laws and policies should be made pursuant to the holdings of Employment Division v. Smith, which protect religious beliefs rather than conduct.”

Then the commission gets to what it really wants, stating federal legislation “should be considered to clarify that RFRA creates First Amendment Free Exercise Clause rights only for individuals and religious institutions and only to the extent that they do not unduly burden civil liberties and civil rights protections against status-based discrimination.”

“States with RFRA-style laws should amend those statutes to clarify that RFRA creates First Amendment Free Exercise Clause rights only for individuals and religious institutions. States with laws modeled after RFRA must guarantee that those statutes do not unduly burden civil liberties and civil rights with status-based discrimination.”

A majority of the eight-member commission, which makes recommendations but does not have the power to impose change, is lobbying for a precedent that would give homosexual or transgender rights preference over religious rights.

The commissioners deliberately chose to single out for denigration Christian colleges or organizations that don’t promote homosexuality and business owners who choose not to endorse homosexuality with their artistic talents, such as photography and cake-making.

Four of the commissioners are appointed by the president and four by Congress to six-year terms, with no more than four members allowed to be of the same political party.

However, the current commission has only one Republican member, Peter Kirsanow, and four Democrat members. Three members are “independents.”

The president also designates the chairman and vice-chairman from among the commission’s members with the concurrence of a majority of the members.

‘War on religious freedom’

The nonprofit legal group Liberty Counsel called the commissions recommendations “a shocking example of the war against religious freedom in America.”

“The commission’s report is a shameful anti-American and anti-God document that trashes religious freedom,” said Mat Staver, founder and chairman of Liberty Counsel.

Staver charge the commission’s chairman, Democrat Martin Castro, is “out of touch with reality and with our Constitution.”

“He and the other members of the commission who agree with him want to throw out the First Amendment and trash religious freedom whenever faith and practice collides with an intolerant LGBT agenda,” Staver said. “The report is a declaration of war against religious freedom. George Washington said anyone who works against the twin pillars of religion and morality cannot be called a ‘Patriot.’ This report is un-American.”

Commissioner Kirsanow, the panel’s lone Republican, said the problem is that people are enamored with “gay rights” and “transgender rights” and are inserting their own desires into the Constitution.

“The tension between nondiscrimination and religious liberty is based on the assumption that the rights in conflict are of equal weight, or even that nondiscrimination is of greater weight,” he said. “This assumption is erroneous. Religious liberty is an undisputed constitutional right. With the exception of racial nondiscrimination principles embedded in the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenths Amendments, nondiscrimination principles are statutory or judicially created constructs.”

Two worldviews

Kirsanow described the sharp differences on the commission as a “conflict between two worldviews.”

“The first, which is secularism, holds an individual’s unfettered sexual self-expression as a preeminent concern because it is an aspect of their self-creation,” he explained. “This interest in the individual is now construed as a positive responsibility to ensure that everyone has the ability to engage in sexual conduct without cost or consequence, whether in money, unwanted children, or hurt feelings.

“An individual’s sexual behavior is considered an act of self-creation and something that goes to the deepest level of their identity. Criticism of an individual’s behavior is considered an attack on the dignity of the person. Naturally, this worldview is at odds with many aspects of traditional morality grounded in sexual restraint.

“The second worldview holds that individuals are not their own judge, but rather are subject to divine law and divine judgment. The morality of a person’s conduct does not ultimately depend upon whether he thinks it is right, or whether it accords with his desires, but whether it conforms to divine law.”

He said the “rub” is that the first group does not recognize sin as sin, and the second group does.

The Obama administration’s move to make the standard “freedom of worship” dates back to early in his tenure.

Catholic Online and other media outlets reported what appeared to be a deliberate misdirection regarding what the Constitution requires.

Catholic Online noted that in President Obama’s June 2009 speech in Cairo, Egypt, he spoke of a Muslim America and the nation’s “freedom of religion,” but by the November 2009 memorial for the Fort Hood soldiers gunned down by a homicidal Muslim, he was terming it “freedom of worship.”

From that point, “freedom of worship” has become the term of choice, the report said.

Under fire

Sarah Torre of the Heritage Foundation said the difference is significant. In practice, the “freedom to worship” seldom has been challenged or even questioned. But “freedom of religion” is under direct fire.
Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2016/09/fed-report-amend-laws-so-gay-rights-trump-faith/#gak7Uuh9ZlKtVBid.99

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