The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

Written between October 1787 and August 1788, The Federalist Papers is a collection of newspaper essays written in defense of the Constitution. Writing under the penname Publius, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay explain the merits of the proposed Constitution, while confronting objections raised by its opponents. Thomas Jefferson described the work as “the best commentary on the principles of government, which ever was written.” This course will explore major themes of The Federalist Papers, such as the problem of majority faction, separation of powers, and the three branches of government.

Introduction: Articles of Confederation and the Constitutional Convention
Larry P. Arnn
February 23, 2015

The Improved Science of Politics
Paul A. Rahe
March 2, 2015

The Problem of Majority Faction
Paul Moreno
March 9, 2015

Federalism and Republicanism
Will Morrisey
March 16, 2015

Separation of Powers
Matthew Spalding
March 23, 2015

The Legislative: House and Senate
Will Morrisey
March 30, 2015

The Executive
Paul A. Rahe
April 6, 2015

The Judiciary
Paul Moreno
April 13, 2015

“The Constitution is Itself . . . a Bill of Rights”
Will Morrisey
April 20, 2015

Conclusion: Constitutionalism Today
Larry P. Arnn
April 27, 2015